August292013

We finally filled out compliment jar. I’ve never seen these kiddos happier than when I told them they’d have free choice centers. :)

July182013
unhistorical:


It seemed as if all of them guessed their fate, but not one of them uttered a single sound.

July 17, 1918: The Romanovs are killed.
After a turbulent and much-hated twenty-three year-long reign, Tsar Nicholas II abdicated the throne and passed the title of tsar to his brother, who acknowledged the authority of the Provisional Government. This too was overthrown in the 1917 October Revolution by Bolsheviks who installed their own government, bringing to an end the Russia of old and the 300-year-old Romanov dynasty. Meanwhile, the former tsar and his family - including his wife Alexandra, four daughters Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia, and son Alexei - were relocated to Tobolsk, and then to Yekaterinburg, located in the Ural Mountains.
The remnants of the imperial family were held in the Ipatiev House - “the House of Special Purpose” - as both civil war and world war raged around them. By the summer of 1918, White Army forces were on the move and, to the dismay of the Bolsheviks, approaching Yekaterinburg, Though they were unaware of the family’s imprisonment there, losing the Romanovs to anti-Bolshevik forces who could potentially use the deposed tsar as a rallying point posed too great a risk, and so the decision to execute them was quickly made and transmitted by telegraph, to be carried out by Yakov Yurovsky and a force of ten soldiers and local Bolsheviks. 
There is no universally agreed upon account of the exact manner of their execution, but, according to the chief executioner’s version of the events, the family was awakened at 2:00 AM and brought to the basement of the Ipatiev House, supposedly for their own safety. Yurovsky read aloud to the family their execution orders, to their confusion, and then commenced the shooting. Those who did not die in the initial onslaught of bullets were stabbed to death with bayonets or shot in the head. Those killed alongside the Romanovs included a court physician, a maid, footman, and cook. DNA analysis has since confirmed the deaths of all the Romanovs, but rumors surrounding the possible survival of Grand Duchess Anastasia, the youngest Romanov daughter, persisted into the late 20th century. 


today in history. :)

unhistorical:

It seemed as if all of them guessed their fate, but not one of them uttered a single sound.

July 17, 1918: The Romanovs are killed.

After a turbulent and much-hated twenty-three year-long reign, Tsar Nicholas II abdicated the throne and passed the title of tsar to his brother, who acknowledged the authority of the Provisional Government. This too was overthrown in the 1917 October Revolution by Bolsheviks who installed their own government, bringing to an end the Russia of old and the 300-year-old Romanov dynasty. Meanwhile, the former tsar and his family - including his wife Alexandra, four daughters Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia, and son Alexei - were relocated to Tobolsk, and then to Yekaterinburg, located in the Ural Mountains.

The remnants of the imperial family were held in the Ipatiev House - “the House of Special Purpose” - as both civil war and world war raged around them. By the summer of 1918, White Army forces were on the move and, to the dismay of the Bolsheviks, approaching Yekaterinburg, Though they were unaware of the family’s imprisonment there, losing the Romanovs to anti-Bolshevik forces who could potentially use the deposed tsar as a rallying point posed too great a risk, and so the decision to execute them was quickly made and transmitted by telegraph, to be carried out by Yakov Yurovsky and a force of ten soldiers and local Bolsheviks.

There is no universally agreed upon account of the exact manner of their execution, but, according to the chief executioner’s version of the events, the family was awakened at 2:00 AM and brought to the basement of the Ipatiev House, supposedly for their own safety. Yurovsky read aloud to the family their execution orders, to their confusion, and then commenced the shooting. Those who did not die in the initial onslaught of bullets were stabbed to death with bayonets or shot in the head. Those killed alongside the Romanovs included a court physician, a maid, footman, and cook. DNA analysis has since confirmed the deaths of all the Romanovs, but rumors surrounding the possible survival of Grand Duchess Anastasia, the youngest Romanov daughter, persisted into the late 20th century. 

today in history. :)

(via stinson)

November62012

(Source: heartsuits, via allaboutsuits)

November52012
sandykatrina:

I am so glad that people are sending in photos.  I put it out there for NOLA people to please send in their own pictures since I can’t get to everyone and I will be leaving for NYC tomorrow (hopefully!).  This is from Heather:
“I am a 5th generation New Orleanian. My family has weathered many floods and even yellow fever. But, Katrina took every ounce of strength for us to rebuild. I was living back at my child hood home at the time the storm hit trying to get my fledging business off the ground. It is located in Metairie, a suburb about 20 minutes outside of New Orleans. My parent’s home was flooded with over a foot of water from Katrina. I ended up being evacuated to Tulsa, Oklahoma to stay with my sister’s family. One of my dogs that had evacuated with me died in Oklahoma within a week of the hurricane hitting. It was a devastating loss which still lives with me today.  I cried tears so hard while evacuated that sometimes I couldn’t breathe.  And, a deep depression settled over me until I was able to return home. My business is my very own love letter to New Orleans. It is based upon my NOLA photography. So, I knew my body of work was more relevant than ever after Katrina.  I had to get back HOME. I was gone from my beloved New Orleans for over 3 months. When I returned it was encouragement from friends, family and customers that held me together emotionally. And, my photography became my Post Katrina therapy. So, I would tell everyone in NY and NJ to keep the faith. Try to be patient with yourself and those around you. Please remember your recovery is not a sprint. It’s a marathon. Change will not come overnight. Be ready for twists and turns as the recovery unfolds. And, if you need to talk to someone, do it! Don’t bottle your emotions up. If you want to fall to your knees and cry, do it! Your loss is palpable and it’s okay to cry your eyes out till they are red and bloodshot. Not only does your neighborhood have to recover, YOU will have to heal from this tragic loss. Lastly, remember this: When you think the nation has moved on in the days of 24 hour cable news, think again. New Orleans intimately knows your pain and we are thinking of each of you in the long term. We are holding you up in prayer in your darkest moments. We have walked in your shoes. Keep your chin up. Take it day by day. And, don’t ever forget NOLA loves y’all!”
Photo courtesy of Heather

sandykatrina:

I am so glad that people are sending in photos.  I put it out there for NOLA people to please send in their own pictures since I can’t get to everyone and I will be leaving for NYC tomorrow (hopefully!).  This is from Heather:

“I am a 5th generation New Orleanian. My family has weathered many floods and even yellow fever. But, Katrina took every ounce of strength for us to rebuild. I was living back at my child hood home at the time the storm hit trying to get my fledging business off the ground. It is located in Metairie, a suburb about 20 minutes outside of New Orleans. My parent’s home was flooded with over a foot of water from Katrina. I ended up being evacuated to Tulsa, Oklahoma to stay with my sister’s family. One of my dogs that had evacuated with me died in Oklahoma within a week of the hurricane hitting. It was a devastating loss which still lives with me today.  I cried tears so hard while evacuated that sometimes I couldn’t breathe.  And, a deep depression settled over me until I was able to return home. My business is my very own love letter to New Orleans. It is based upon my NOLA photography. So, I knew my body of work was more relevant than ever after Katrina.  I had to get back HOME. I was gone from my beloved New Orleans for over 3 months. When I returned it was encouragement from friends, family and customers that held me together emotionally. And, my photography became my Post Katrina therapy. So, I would tell everyone in NY and NJ to keep the faith. Try to be patient with yourself and those around you. Please remember your recovery is not a sprint. It’s a marathon. Change will not come overnight. Be ready for twists and turns as the recovery unfolds. And, if you need to talk to someone, do it! Don’t bottle your emotions up. If you want to fall to your knees and cry, do it! Your loss is palpable and it’s okay to cry your eyes out till they are red and bloodshot. Not only does your neighborhood have to recover, YOU will have to heal from this tragic loss. Lastly, remember this: When you think the nation has moved on in the days of 24 hour cable news, think again. New Orleans intimately knows your pain and we are thinking of each of you in the long term. We are holding you up in prayer in your darkest moments. We have walked in your shoes. Keep your chin up. Take it day by day. And, don’t ever forget NOLA loves y’all!”

Photo courtesy of Heather

November42012
2AM

(Source: lilaculpepper, via stinson)

November12012
2AM
2AM

No matter how many times I see this, the last two lines always take my breath away

I had this on my coffee cup once! I loved it!

No matter how many times I see this, the last two lines always take my breath away

I had this on my coffee cup once! I loved it!

(via fraternalclassics)

2AM
carolinatarheelstate:

carolinasunsets:

also applies to the Carolinas.

thank you

phahaha.

carolinatarheelstate:

carolinasunsets:

also applies to the Carolinas.

thank you

phahaha.

(Source: cr0nin, via fraternalclassics)

2AM
i love them. i love their families. i love their platform. i think they’re going to be great for our country.

i love them. i love their families. i love their platform. i think they’re going to be great for our country.

(via sweet-southern-charm)

1AM
onthewaytoclass:

who wears belts?

I’m such a sucker for cute boys in suspenders.

onthewaytoclass:

who wears belts?

I’m such a sucker for cute boys in suspenders.

(Source: properkid, via fraternalclassics)

1AM
fratcandy:

college crush.

I remember days like this in the quaddddd.

fratcandy:

college crush.

I remember days like this in the quaddddd.

(via fraternalclassics)

September242012

September 22nd, 1994 - FRIENDS pilot airs

“Welcome to the real world. It sucks. You’re gonna love it.”

(via fraternalclassics)

September202012
Famous or not. Kennedy or not. Rich or poor. Whatever the circumstances that your family finds itself in, I think it’s so important to remember, that in the eyes of a child, his/her parents are the most important people in the world. I want to be the best mother. And I pray, all the time, that whoever I’m blessed with as a husband wants to be the best father. I want my kids to follow their father around like this. And I want how our children view him to make him feel as if he is the most important man in the world. 

Famous or not. Kennedy or not. Rich or poor. Whatever the circumstances that your family finds itself in, I think it’s so important to remember, that in the eyes of a child, his/her parents are the most important people in the world. I want to be the best mother. And I pray, all the time, that whoever I’m blessed with as a husband wants to be the best father. I want my kids to follow their father around like this. And I want how our children view him to make him feel as if he is the most important man in the world. 

(Source: valenswright, via fraternalclassics)

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